The World is Yours for the Taking

Are you feeling curious?   I'm Megan, and I might be the chillest person you will ever meet.

stunningpicture:

Kids work together to create eternal recess

stunningpicture:

Kids work together to create eternal recess

(via nsome)

— 3 days ago with 394503 notes

sansaofhousestark:

australia’s got a lot of fucked up shit going on but at least we can say our last mass shooting was 18 years ago

because after it happened we placed higher restrictions on gun ownership

because that’s the logical fucking thing to do

(via alegnajoy)

— 3 days ago with 363691 notes

the-monstrumologist:

ydrill:

Enjoying bath

OH
MY
GOD
HOW
FUCKING
CUTE

(via alegnajoy)

— 3 days ago with 572104 notes
westcoastwaterbender:

radicalmuscle:

onlylolgifs:

The floor is lava!

What kind of parents actually pour lava into their homes just so their kid can have some fun?

The fun kind.

westcoastwaterbender:

radicalmuscle:

onlylolgifs:

The floor is lava!

What kind of parents actually pour lava into their homes just so their kid can have some fun?

The fun kind.

(via nsome)

— 5 days ago with 261734 notes

soras-majestic-butt:

do you ever catch yourself thinking of something so weird and fucked up that you have to stop mid-thought and your face is

image

(Source: soras-spooky-butt, via nsome)

— 5 days ago with 88191 notes
rhamphotheca:

October is Save the Kiwi Month!  The National Zoo, in Washington D.C., boasts the nation’s only “Meet a Kiwi” program, where visitors can observe our young male, Pip, up close and learn about conservation efforts. Meet and greets take place every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday at 11 a.m. The Zoo has contributed greatly to the Brown Kiwi Species Survival Plan; Maori (father) and Nessus (mother) produced six chicks from February 2006 to March 2012. The Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute in Front Royal, Va., also has a breeding pair of kiwi and hatched a chick January 2013. Native to New Zealand, brown kiwis (Apteryx mantelli) are nocturnal, flightless birds. The remaining wild population of the brown kiwi is estimated at roughly 24,000, down from 60,000 in the 1980s. The kiwi population is stabilizing in areas where conservation efforts occur. #WeSaveSpeciesPhoto Credit: Mehgan Murphy, Smithsonian’s National Zoo
(via: Smithsonian’s National Zoo)

rhamphotheca:

October is Save the Kiwi Month!

The National Zoo, in Washington D.C., boasts the nation’s only “Meet a Kiwi” program, where visitors can observe our young male, Pip, up close and learn about conservation efforts. Meet and greets take place every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday at 11 a.m.

The Zoo has contributed greatly to the Brown Kiwi Species Survival Plan; Maori (father) and Nessus (mother) produced six chicks from February 2006 to March 2012. The Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute in Front Royal, Va., also has a breeding pair of kiwi and hatched a chick January 2013.

Native to New Zealand, brown kiwis (Apteryx mantelli) are nocturnal, flightless birds. The remaining wild population of the brown kiwi is estimated at roughly 24,000, down from 60,000 in the 1980s. The kiwi population is stabilizing in areas where conservation efforts occur. #WeSaveSpecies

Photo Credit: Mehgan Murphy, Smithsonian’s National Zoo

(via: Smithsonian’s National Zoo)

— 5 days ago with 482 notes